Drawing for a Donation

September 10, 2009

Make a donation of 10 dollars or more,  I will make a 4″ x 6″ postcard size drawing and send it to you in the mail. The drawing will be a surprise and I will send the drawing within 2 weeks of the donation. The procedes of the money donated with go to assisting my mother with her rent, utilities and food. To find out why I am doing this please visit www.rebeccaeilering.com/artassistance.htm

As I make the drawings, I will post them on here.

Ways to Donate:

1.  You may either pay by credit card or through your checking account.

2. I will accept checks through the mail. Please contact me at reileri@yahoo.com so I can give you my mailing address.

So….Put me to WORK!!

To donate:

www.rebeccaeilering.com/artassistanceDonate.htm

For more information about Artassistance:

www.rebeccaeilering.com/artassistance.htm

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Computer Chips and Art

July 16, 2009

While at the library I cam across a magazine called, Technology Review. It is published by MIT. Specifically, the one I was looking at was the February 2009 issue. I picked it up and just started flipping through the pages. While at it, I came across these wonderful pictures of computer chips; large and detailed. I was pretty stunned at how beautiful they are.

These pictures brought to mind some artists…specifically the painter Peter Halley and  Hans Hoffman. Halley’s definitely have a circuit or diagram influence. Being that his paintings started showing up in the 1980s, computer circuitry influence doesn’t seem far fetched. In comparison to an actual chip, they are extremely simplified. However, Hans Hoffman started gaining a reputation as an abstract expressionist painter in the early-mid 20th century. So I doubt a connection could be made to computer chips. I just thought of him because of the hard-edged geometric squares and rectangles that lay in contrast to free-form “painterly” brush strokes. With some of the chips there are some ridged areas and some areas that seem more murky. There isn’t the “push” or “pull” that made the Hoffman paintings so famous.

Here are a couple Halley paintings:

panic-room

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2140184089_e0737b4022 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are a couple of Hoffman paintings:

hofmann 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

102786 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ok, here are the chips I was looking at in the magazine:

L to R top: Intel 8080, Intel 8086; L to R bottom: Intel 386, AMD 386

L to R top: Intel 8080, Intel 8086; L to R bottom: Intel 386, AMD 386

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

motorola 68000 introduced in 1979. Powered the Macintosh 128K

motorola 68000 introduced in 1979. Powered the Macintosh 128K

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L: Intel Pentium processor introduced in 1993; R: IBM PowerPC 601 also introduced in 93

L: Intel Pentium processor introduced in 1993; R: IBM PowerPC 601 also introduced in 93

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The IBM PowerPC chip was developed jointly with Apple and Motorola. This chip was used in Power Macs.

Intel Pentium 4 chip introduced in 2000

Intel Pentium 4 chip introduced in 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2007's Intel Core 2 Duo

2007's Intel Core 2 Duo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I will make note that these chips are in chronological order. The first one was introduced in 1974 and had 5,000 transistors and was the heart of the Altair personal computer. The last one, introduced in 2007, has 410 million transistors and more than one” core” plus a huge data cache. It is amazing how complex these things are and the size of todays chips are tiny in comparison to ones in the past.


Citygarden STL

July 7, 2009

Last Wednesday I was able to make it over to the new sculpture garden/park in downtown St. Louis called Citygarden. It is a beautiful display of garden, landscape architecture, and sculpture all mixed together to form a landmark that is friendly to the art scholar and kids and adults that just want to have fun and relax. It is just blocks from Busch Stadium and a block from the 8th and Pine Metrolink station. 

What a wonderful gift. Here are some pictures of some of the works. 

 

Each square is a different chime sound. Info on this is not on the map but is fun.

Each square is a different chime sound. Info on this is not on the map but is fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Untitled (Two Rabbits) by Tom Claassen

Untitled (Two Rabbits) by Tom Claassen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obviously the kids love to climb on this one. Looks like it is made of marshmallow and is light and soft. However, It is made of bronze. Evidently there are real live rabbits that live in this park. I saw one baby brown rabbit and when I tried to take a picture it scurried into a bush. 

 

Untitled (Ringed Figure) by Keith Haring

Untitled (Ringed Figure) by Keith Haring

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How many art objects can a person climb on without being repremanded? Pretty much all of them here. As you can see, this young man scaled to the top ring to pose for a picture. I am sure this will be a common phenomenon. I believe this is at he corner of 10th and Market. The building in the background is the NBC affiliate, KSDK. 

 

Eros Bendato (Eros Bound) by Igor Mitoraj

Eros Bendato (Eros Bound) by Igor Mitoraj

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This one seems to be a crowd pleaser. This piece is large enough to walk into and one can peer out of the eye sockets. Plus there is the water element in front. Overall, water seems to be a main element of this park. On a hot, humid  summer St. Louis afternoon this will be popular. 

 

2 Arcs x 4 230.5 Degree Arc x 5 by Bernar Venet

2 Arcs x 4 230.5 Degree Arc x 5 by Bernar Venet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who thought a conceptual piece by an artist who’s work is based on math and emotional detachment could be fun? Well, if you can climb on it….simple fun.

 

Scarecrow by Donald Baechler

Scarecrow by Donald Baechler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I can see the scarecrow and it is kind of dark and menacing. Sits near the edge of the garden so it seems appropriate. This figure does remind me of Abraham Lincoln with the tall stovepipe hat and tall lanky figure. Actually, it looks like an effigy of Lincoln. 

 

This is Kiera and Julian Walking by Julian Opie

This is Kiera and Julian Walking by Julian Opie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are two of these animated LED panels in the park. This is just what people are meant to do in this park, go for a stroll. 

 

 

Looking east. Standing on the rocks below the Northern River Bluffs Band.

Looking east. Standing on the rocks below the Northern River Bluffs Band.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is this arching band that extends across the northern edge of the park. This part has a nice pool with stepping stones and a waterfall. This band is supposed to represent the bluffs. The park is laid out in three bands that represent the geographic features of the region.

Many of the buildings surrounding the park are the glass curtain style and this creates many great reflections.

 

Twain by Richard Serra

Twain by Richard Serra

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is probably the most hated sculpture in St. Louis. It is just across 10th street, the western edge of the park. It is not in the park but it looks rather sad and lonely. I really feel bad for this piece. I hope something can be done to maybe expand the park and include this work and reframe it in a new way. Maybe people could feel differently about Twain. 

To find out more about Citygarden click here.

To find out more about the Gateway Foundation click here. They funded the project and made this happen. It is in a way a gift to the city. It will be run like any city park.


Announcement and Cindy Tower

June 5, 2009

Slacking on the blogging. However, I am not slacking in general. I am going to be part of a group show at St. Charles Community College this August. It is their annual Multimedia Exhibition. I am honored to be invited and to be showing with some other awesome St. Louis artists. Plus, I am working on a website for someone I know who has a business. Plus, I might have a few more things in the pipeline. Other than that, I’ve been out riding the bike and enjoying the outdoors. After all, it is summer-time. 

A month or two ago I went to check out some art at the Sheldon Art Galleries. I wanted to see what was up with all the hoopla over the Cindy Tower exhibit. She does plein air paintings of industrial and inner city ruins. Mostly, these are in East St. Louis. Plus, she documents the process. 

I have sort of mixed opinion of her. The paintings are nice as paintings. She is obviously a talented painter can really capture all the detail and beauty of the spaces in decay. They actually seem lifelike. 

IMG_1073

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think the paintings can stand on their own. This is where I feel mixed. She makes videos documenting the process of painting these. Obviously, the process is important to her. However, I question the importance to the viewer. Is the video supposed to demystify the process or is it purely self-indulgent? My opinion is that the documentation is unnecessary and I would like to have some mystery. Honestly, I am not interested in the process. Well, I like to imagine what it is like.

Some part of me feels like it is exploitative too. Here is a white woman going into a perceived dangerous ghetto that is almost 100% non-white. She goes in and makes these paintings and then selling showings and probably selling these paintings to well-off people. She seems interested in showing the decay and the beauty of it. However, is she doing anything to make those areas better? I am not sure. Anyway, does she even want that? I mean, that is her subject and the revival of East St. Louis would take away her subject matter. Of course, this is St. Louis. There are plenty of areas wrought with decay. 

Plus she is blatantly breaking the law and brags about it in the videos. I think that sort of makes artists look bad. To me, she is trying to make the paintings a performance but I don’t like the “bragging” about how dangerous the process is. it just seems like a case of a well-off privileged white woman having an adventure (slumming) at the expense of the poor.

I like the paintings and I do find the warped canvases, the dirt and the grime that is on the paintings because of the circumstances of creating them quite nice. They are not these precious and pristine objects. They reflect the subjects well. I am just not sure about the need for the documentation and just giving away the process and not leaving any kind of mystery for my imagination.

Why do I want mystery? In my case when I see an abandoned building or drive through a run down area, being a white woman from crystal clean suburbia, I do have this fascination with decay. It does seem exotic. I do get a sense of wonder because it is different. I get curious and want to explore but I get a sense of fear and anxiety of the unknown. Seeing the paintings lets me see inside and still get that feeling. I guess, I don’t want to the reality because it does expose how well off I am in the world. I guess it makes me feel guilty in finding pleasure in someone else’s pain. What I see between the paintings and the documentation is a tug-a-war or reality and romanticism. However, the mystery is gone. 

The paintings with the artist statement with the description of the process was enough for me. The videos….not interested. However, the work does pose some interesting and pressing sociological issues that St. Louis and the nation needs to deal with.


Can Artists Save Malls?

May 2, 2009

Artist have had a way of coming in and setting up studios and galleries and depressed areas of inner cities due to rents being cheap and space being a plenty. Then the same area becomes hip and and undergoes gentrification. Real Estate values go up and space becomes more scarce. Thus, eventually pushing the artist out to find new pastures to work.

I was listening to Cityscape on KWMU yesterday. I didn’t listen to the whole show but they were talking to the people from Crestwood Court and ArtSpace.

The mall concept that was quite popular in the 70s and 80s and into the 90s has been in a general state of decline in general. Many malls are dying or have died. Northwest Plaza is a great example of a spectacular failure. It was a hugely successful mall and was once the largest mall in the US. However, in recent years, this mall in St. Ann (St. Louis suburb near Lambert Airport) has become an empty shell of its former self. Empty store fronts are common place and some malls are going bankrupt. This is probably partially due to the bad economy but outdoor shopping areas that are sort of a mix of strip mall and downtown main street have been becoming popular.

To explain, Crestwood Court (used to be Crestwood Mall) has been a mall in decline. This aging mall had had its problems lately. Most recent, Macy’s has closed as part of a series of layoffs and store closings because of the economy.

So what to do with all the empty space in malls? Open it up to artists. ArtSpace is part of Crestwood Courts plan to offer studio and gallery space to artists and art groups. The rent is inexpensive and there are plenty of amenities such as running water, heat and electricity. Plus, having this space in a mall makes art more accessible to people who are not as likely to go into the inner city (fears of crime and feeling like a fish out of water) to visit a gallery or may not have had much interest in art. Can the mall transform from just a shopping mecca dedicated to pop culture, whatever fad is in at the moment and consumption to a place where people can get some a cultural experience that enriches the public in a more meaningful way?

Can artists make the mall hip? Will retailers become attracted again to malls? Can the mall become a mixed use center that is not just for shopping, but is a place were people can live and get some culture? If this is successful and the mall can be revitalized, what will happen to the artists?


Claudia Schmacke at SLAM

April 21, 2009

A couple weeks ago I stopped at the St. Louis Art Museum to see the Currents 103: Claudia Schmacke exhibition. It is up on the third floor in the 301 and 337 galleries. The show runs until July 5th, 2009. 

Claudia Schmacke is a German artist based in Berlin who explores temporally and the perception of time.

Part of the exhibition was a sculpture made of plastic tubing, water and fluorescent dye that loops out  and stretches out across one of the walls. The water is being propelled through the tubes, thus there is a noticeable hum. This sound seems to have some importance to the piece itself so it is not just purely incidental. This particular piece is called Time reel. 

The title makes an obvious reference to film reels. In this day and age many young people may not get the reference. I remember in school being shown films from a projector and the light clicking noise that was made from the film going reel to reel. The noise sort of has that feel and the fact that the water is cycling makes that reference to the physical, mechanical motions that are involved in showing a film. I think the dye was to make the moving water more noticeable to the viewer. 

Here are some images of Time Reel:

This is nearly the whole piece

This is nearly the whole piece

 

 

detail of the loops

detail of the loops

 

detail of the wall and all the holes

detail of the wall and all the holes

  

The other part of the exhibition is made up of two videos. One is called Umbilicus and the other is called Dark Matter. Both videos were shot in LA near the La Brea Tar Pits. Both videos are looking down into drainage pipes. I only saw part of Umbilicus… it was nearly 20 minutes long. It features water being sucked down this small drainage pipe. Featured prominently are the sucking, gurgling and other sounds that can come from water going down a drain. The sounds would make young children laugh (some adults too).  I do believe she is making references between the body and structures and systems that help keep places functioning.

Also, there is that issue of time. Time being relative. Time always moves as a constant speed (seconds, minutes, hours, days, etc) but our perception of time always changes. When there is excitement time seems to fly. When there is not much going on, leading to boredom, time seems to crawl. Looking at a 20 minute video of water going down a drain seems to be a good example of the latter. The video just never seems to end. I believe the artist is not trying to bore you to death, but is keeping the viewer aware of time and how it is perceived. 

For a still image of one of the videos stop by the St. Louis Art Museum website.

Also, you can stop by the Claudia Schmacke website for more info on her work and career.


New Work With “Webs/Maps” and Oil Bars

April 11, 2009

I am going to make this very short today. I got some new work coming along. Feeling good about the progress being made. Soon I hope to have some pictures of some of the new work. 

I started doing these drawings (mostly for fun so I could get out of the rut I feel like I was in) at first on paper. They were of just random objects I could think of  that related to the day’s events. Then I would wrap or connect them through this “web” made up of little squares. I started to notice the squares and their borders started to look like city plans; sort of like the following map you will see. The pattern that is formed is similar but less “regular” and is not derived from any particular place. It is from my mind. Totally intuitive and layered. 

 

Section of an old map of Vienna, Austria

Section of an old map of Vienna, Austria

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The use of the map is nothing new with my work. I just started a new way to go about it. I then decided I didn’t really need the objects and just started drawing the “web”. I started letting the edges overlap. This formed new “webs”.  Making them is repetitive and meditative. 

Now I have started painting these with oil bars on canvas. I’ll see how those go. I like the oil bars because they are oil paint but applied through drawing. It is immediate and have a raw aesthetic that I like. I work rather fast. It is like being a kid and drawing with the thick crayons. 

So right now it is a combination of these intricate pen drawings that I described in earlier paragraphs and the oil bar drawings derived from the same idea but they look so different. 

So through the elimination of everything except for one element, I have found some inspiration and motivation. So hopefully this is a move forward after about a year of struggling with my work. 

Once I get to a point of being finished with some, I will be sure to show.